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Changing values: Survey says most Americans find it okay to drink, use marijuana

Changing values: Survey says most Americans find it okay to drink, use marijuana

It’s not hard to make decisions when you know what your values are.

  • Roy Disney

The words of wisdom from the noted American businessman signify the value for human lives. A set of principles, standards or qualities held in high regard, values guide the way humans live their lives and have a profound influence in the way they formulate their decisions. Formed by a particular set of beliefs that are considered to be worthwhile, values can influence one’s judgment and the support one offers to others. Our values prevent us from doing something wrong, even drinking or doing drugs. So we thought! Continue reading

Monterey County investigators pull off largest opium bust in the history of California

Monterey County investigators pull off largest opium bust in the history of California

In one of the largest drug busts in California, authorities seized tonnes of opium poppies from Monterey County recently. According to reports, the Monterey County sheriff’s investigators seized more than 34,000 pounds of opium poppies over the period of five weeks. The seized opium poppies, considered the biggest in the history of California, were being cultivated in eight separate fields around the northern part of the county using 5.6 acres of land for the plantation. Continue reading

Treating addiction behind bars – a step towards improving lives and reducing recidivism

Treating addiction behind bars – a step towards improving lives and reducing recidivism

At the end of year 2016, state and federal correctional facilities in the United States held more than 1 million inmates, with nearly half of them serving sentence for drug-related offenses. To reduce overcrowding and recidivism in prisons, correctional authorities began expanding prison-based drug treatment programs. While these programs were not enough to facilitate long-term recovery, the inmates stood a better chance both inside and outside the prisons when they participated in these drug abuse programs during their incarceration. Continue reading

Rep. Tom Garrett quits race for re-election to seek treatment for alcoholism

Rep. Tom Garrett quits race for re-election to seek treatment for alcoholism

Virginia Republican Tom Garrett recently announced his decision not to seek re-election from Central Virginia in the November 2019 elections, owing to his alcohol addiction. The congressman said that he needed to spend more time to recover. In an emotional video statement recently in Richmond’s Capital Square, the 46-year-old told the public that those who know him well, recognized him as a good man and an “alcoholic.” It was the hardest statement he had ever made publicly, he said. According to several of his former staffers, the Virginia republican was seen drinking in his office. Continue reading

Advocacy group urges Florida governor to stop planned cuts to rehabilitation programs

Advocacy group urges Florida governor to stop planned cuts to rehabilitation programs

Nearly a fortnight after requesting Florida Governor Rick Scott to help sort out a terrible budget crisis in the state’s prison system, a leading substance abuse advocacy group has said that Scott hasn’t got back to them. Now, the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association (FADAA) sent a second letter on May 21, 2018, pressing the need to halt planned budget cuts to several local drug abuse and re-entry programs to settle an operational deficit of $28 million in the prison system. Continue reading

State suspends Kanawha-Charleston Health Department’s needle exchange program

State suspends Kanawha-Charleston Health Department’s needle exchange program

Needle exchange programs for drug users have long been considered an effective way to curb the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C. However, the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHS) does not think so. Based on a 62-page review report, the WVDHHS recently discontinued a needle exchange program operated by the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department’s (KCHD) Harm Reduction Clinic in Charleston. Continue reading

Alcohol- and Other Drug-Related Birth Defects Week: Using tramadol and codeine during pregnancy can cause health problems among unborn babies

Alcohol- and Other Drug-Related Birth Defects Week: Using tramadol and codeine during pregnancy can cause health problems among unborn babies

Along with the pleasure associated with the anticipation of impending motherhood, pregnancy might also entail pain and discomfort. As a result, painkillers and discomfort alleviating medicines become common during the period. Unfortunately, painkillers might contain illicit drugs like tramadol or codeine, exposure to which can have harmful effects on the mother as well as the unborn child, warn experts. The harms can range from birth defects and low birth weight to an increased risk of miscarriage or stillbirth. Continue reading

Pharma companies interrogated for their alleged role in West Virginia pill dumping operation

Pharma companies interrogated for their alleged role in West Virginia pill dumping operation

Top executives from Cardinal Health, Miami-Luken, McKesson Corp., AmerisourceBergen Corp. and H.D. Smith Wholesale Drug Co. were recently grilled by members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s panel on oversight and investigations for their alleged role in pill dumping in West Virginia. The year-long investigation culminated in a three-hour questioning session on May 8, 2018 regarding their involvement in the opioid crisis. According to the Democrats and Republicans on the Committee, the five drug distributors are responsible for dumping too many opioids (chiefly hydrocodone and oxycodone pills) in the state and failing to miss the signs of possible side effects. Continue reading

Only 50% of a quarter of New Yorkers with opioid prescriptions were warned about associated risks, says poll

Only 50% of a quarter of New Yorkers with opioid prescriptions were warned about associated risks, says poll

Experts feel that writing opioid prescriptions by doctors plays an intrinsic role in fueling the drug crisis, as people pop the pills without having any knowledge about the consequent harms. This has been seconded by a Siena College poll released on April 29, 2018 which says that out of nearly a quarter of New York residents who were prescribed opioid medications over the last two years, only half of them were warned by a physician against the associated risks. Continue reading